The Washington Post publishes the world’s most epic correction

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Korsha Wilson published an article in the Washington Post’s food section. Then the Post published a correction. The correction is 579 words long and includes 15 bullet points. It raises a few questions about who gets published and who checks facts in the publications you read. Wilson, a freelancer, contributed an article about black families … Continued

Why every book needs an editor. (Even mine.)

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I admit it. I’m an egotistical know-it-all when it comes to writing. But I need an editor, too. (I’m not talking about a copy editor, whose job is to identify typos and grammatical errors. Of course I need one of those, as anyone who has spotted the typos in this blog realizes. So do you.) … Continued

For minority authors, a book can generate respect and counteract bias

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Why should older white men get all the respect? I’ve been talking to a diverse collection of executives, thinkers, and authors: men and women; old and young; white, black, Hispanic, and Asian; North American, European, Asian, and Australian. Here’s a shocker: if you’re seeking attention for your ideas, it’s easier if you’re an older, white, … Continued

Hypocrisy in headlines: How newspapers covered Trump’s call to end racism

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In the wake of the shooting in Texas, Donald Trump has asked the nation to come together to condemn white supremacy and racism. Given his own past statements stirring up racial animosity, how are news media supposed to write about that? For context, he’s been telling women of color in Congress to “go back where … Continued

Cloudflare deplatforms 8chan. Have we figured out where to draw the line?

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The unmoderated site 8chan has hosted some horrifying things, including a hate-filled manifesto that appears to be from the shooter in the El Paso massacre. After 8chan’s cloud network and security provider Cloudflare dumped it, I began to wonder if we’d finally figured out the boundaries of the legitimate internet. The question of what content … Continued

Fall 2020: The smoldering crater in the publishing schedule

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Lord help you if you are planning a nonfiction book launch in the fall of 2020. Normally, agents would be pitching such books to publishers around now. I’m betting those are some bizarre conversations. A successful book launch depends on media and word of mouth. You find writers, bloggers, and podcasters who would be interested … Continued

The Equifax $125 settlement is yet another lie

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Two years ago, Equifax blamed an “application vulnerability” for a “cybersecurity incident” that exposed personal data of 143 million consumers. Last week, it agreed to pay $125 to any affected person who asks for it. Unfortunately, that’s another lie. Here’s what it says on the Equifax Breach Settlement site: Welcome To The Equifax Data Breach … Continued

Why is Capital One bragging about the part of its data that wasn’t stolen?

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Capital One suffered a data breach. Its explanation of how many and which customers were affected is quite confusing — and it has an odd obsession with reporting on what wasn’t stolen rather than what was. According its About page: “Capital One is . . . serving approximately 45 million customer accounts.” So how many … Continued