Customer experience and trust: an AT&T case study

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When I worked closely with Harley Manning and Kerry Bodine, the authors of the customer experience book Outside In, I learned how most customer experience problems are rooted deep within corporate systems. That’s what happened to me this week in an interaction with AT&T. The odyssey of dropping a line from AT&T My son, a … Continued

The Rationalist Papers (2): three ways to look at the election

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How do you decide who to vote for? I see three ways people are deciding: policy, team loyalty, and trust. Just a reminder: these posts are for the group I call the deciders: conservatives, moderates, undecided, and third-party voters considering their choices in the 2020 US Presidential election. Choosing based on policy In a traditional … Continued

The PITA principle, or when should you be a pain in the ass?

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Some people report that I am a sweet, nice, and supportive person. Others would say I am a pain in the ass who never backs down. Both are true. Here’s how that works. I don’t take much on faith. When my new doctor recently prescribed a medication, I had many, many questions. I was argumentative … Continued

In God we trust?

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Every school in South Dakota must now display the motto “In God We Trust” in a prominent location. I have two problems with this: a God problem and a trust problem. South Dakota’s legislature passed the law, joining other states with similar rules including Kentucky. Now every student will be confronted with a statement about … Continued

Facebook is secretly rating your trustworthiness. Excellent!

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According to the Washington Post, Facebook is rating your trustworthiness on a zero-to-one scale. Not only that, they won’t tell you how they rate people. Here’s why that’s a necessary first step in squashing the spread of fake news. First, let’s get this out of the way. Facebook is biased. All social media and search … Continued

How extra words undermine trust: a case study

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Fear makes people hide their meaning with extra words. It backfires. We know you’re afraid. Adding words make people less likely to trust you. A friend forwarded me an excellent example: a 414-word missive about financial improprieties in the school district of Northborough/Southborough, Massachusetts. I know how this letter must have developed: a panicked set of people at the … Continued